APJMM Goals

Ozarks At Large (031119) with guests Kwami & Clarice Abdul-Bey
on KUAF 91.3 FM University of Arkansas at Fayetteville
lynch definition

(1) Creating a collection of soil samples from the most approximate locations of each documented site of racial, political, and religious violence and injustice (i.e., documented historical lynching, expulsions, cleansings, riots and massacres);

(2) Designing and erecting, at each site, standard historical markers, to remember the victims of racial, political, and religious violence and injustice;

(3) Designing and minting commemorative geocoins to be strategically placed near all of the historical markers, and commemorative special event challenge coins to be presented to the descendants of the victims, the perpetrators, and the onlookers;


(4) Establishing a centrally located memorial monument to commemorate the reconciliation of the descendants of the victims, the perpetrators, and the onlookers;


(5) Developing a statewide K-12 interdisciplinary curriculum, incorporating already existing lesson plans from the Encyclopedia of Arkansas, that teaches the difficult history of racial, political, and religious violence and injustice, in accordance with A.C.A. § 13-3-206 (Historical contributions by the black race — Arkansas history courses), A.C.A. § 6-16-124 (Arkansas history — Required social studies course) and A.C.A. § 6-16-121 (African-American history — Teaching materials) (the curriculum will include an interactive web-based map of all of the historical markers);


(6) Hosting an annual statewide high school racial, political, and religious violence and injustice essay and spoken word poetry contest;

(7) Producing a companion compilation CD of Arkansas-based musical artists and spoken word poets to distribute to school districts throughout the state as part of the developed curriculum;


(8) Conducting genealogical research to attempt to locate descendants of the victims and the perpetrators, as part of our reconciliation efforts;

(9) Presenting throughout Arkansas artistic expressions, such as plays, art exhibits, etc., related to the topic of racial, political, and religious violence and injustice, (for example, resurrecting a lynching photography exhibit that toured the U.S. in the 1940s-1950s); and


(10) Using “community-based solutions-oriented journalism” techniques to record oral history interviews with the descendants of both the victims, the perpetrators, and the onlookers of the documented incidents of racial, political, and religious violence and injustice throughout Arkansas.

Comments are closed.